Branding Bhagat: 5 points about Brand CB and 1 Indian Girl

Update: Since I published this blog in 2017, I have had the opportunity to read Ms. Bajpai's book. The stories bear no resemblance to each other. At all. Her story draws significantly on Bhagat's college romance formula. This accusation was a cheap publicity stunt. When the news broke that Chetan Bhagat was being sued for … Continue reading Branding Bhagat: 5 points about Brand CB and 1 Indian Girl

Understanding Chetan Bhagat’s One Indian Girl on her own terms

After the reviews for One Indian Girl began to pour in, Chiki Sarkar of Juggernaut asked, “Why not review it on its own terms?”  This review is a response to that question. 5 Points Readers Expect from a Chetan Bhagat Novel Like a Harlequin romance, a Chetan Bhagat novel has certain conventions. Both brands are … Continue reading Understanding Chetan Bhagat’s One Indian Girl on her own terms

I am a Chetan Bhagat fan, and I am not an idiot: A 2001-word editorial odyssey

Recently, I was involved in a discussion in a writer’s group about Chetan Bhagat. Unlike most similar discussions, this one did not degenerate into the vitriol that usually happens when Chetan Bhagat is mentioned. In part, because the discussion was not limited to Bhagat himself, but included Amish Tripathi, Durjoy Datta, Ravi Subramanian, and other bestsellers. … Continue reading I am a Chetan Bhagat fan, and I am not an idiot: A 2001-word editorial odyssey

How to cure your Indian election hangover

The wait is over. Finally. After 6 weeks, 9 phases, 3 dry days, and more than 550 million votes cast, India finally has a new prime minister: Narendra Modi. Congress conceded defeat around lunch time today. The mood around Mumbai has changed. This afternoon, the vibe feels positive, more energetic than usual. The stock market … Continue reading How to cure your Indian election hangover

W is for writers

W is for writers, specifically Indian writers. I asked my Facebook peeps to suggest their favorite Indian writers. The answers were enlightening. Expats living in India suggested authors like Salman Rushdie, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy, while Indians suggested Jhumpa Lahiri, Chetan Bhagat, Amish Tripathi, and Ashwin Sanghi. Of course, I have my own favorite … Continue reading W is for writers